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Impact of Corean Unification
(Updated Tuesday, Apr 1, 2008, 04:53:25 PM)

t's been over a decade since the Iron Curtain came crashing down in Europe. The Bamboo Curtain is little more than a quaint phrase. Yet the Cold War remains very much alive on the Corean (Korean for those who prefer the colonial spelling) peninsula.
     Across a 186-mile DMZ glare opposing armies collectively totaling 1.7 million. By all reckoning the Pyongyang regime should have become ideological roadkill following the collapse of communism. Instead, it remains an impregnable roadblock to the economic integration of East Asia, the world's fastest-growing region.
     How can an economic nonentity be such a roadblock?
     Consider its location at what should have been the crossroads of East Asia. With 56% of the peninsula's land mass, North Corea separates on one side the world's greatest market and labor pool (China) and the biggest reserve of natural resources (Sibera) from, on the other, two of the world's leading technological and manufacturing nations (Japan and South Corea).
     But for Pyongyang's intransigence Seoul would already be linked by railroads and superhighways to Beijing, Moscow, Berlin, Paris and London. All those cities would also be linked to Tokyo via a bridge across the 126-mile strait dividing Shimonoseki from Pusan. The savings in shipping cost and time alone could amount to tens of billions of dollars a year. Such a trans-Eurasian land link would accelerate the cultural and economic integration of not only East Asia, but the world. In the process, the Corean peninsula would shed the burden of financing the world's most heavily fortified frontier and become the center of the global economy.
     That's the vision dancing before the eyes of farsighted statesmen and business leaders pushing for the political leaps of faith needed to keep Pyongyang taking its unsteady baby steps toward opening North Corea.
     But skeptics and pessimists abound. Even a loose confederation with the North would only burden and destabilize South Corea's economy and political system, they argue. For decades to come the impact on the global economy would be entirely negative as investors and customers begin shunning the uncertainties, denying capital and trading partners to hundreds of world-class Corean manufacturers. The ultimate result, argue the naysayers, would be to throw a monkey wrench into an alignment that has allowed three decades of strong growth for East Asia.
     What is the likely impact of Corean unification?

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WHAT YOU SAY

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Finally China has convinced the USA and NK to meet in Beijing to talk.

At least there is one sane country left in the region to move things in the right direction.
AC Dropout
   Wednesday, April 16, 2003 at 09:37:48 (PDT)    [24.136.115.189]
JJH, you narrowed minded idiot.

What do you think America, the country with the most deadly inventory of nuclear weapons will do, if New York gets nuked by terrorists?

I don't know where you are living, but if such unfortunate thing were to happen, I will guarantee you that whereever you are, you will be breathing radioactive air.
ka
   Wednesday, April 09, 2003 at 11:53:32 (PDT)    [168.103.182.191]
JJH- the terrorists already attacked the US. Less than 3 years later we're back to normal and our economy is rising again. No one can bring us down.
shut up smug b$$tard
   Wednesday, April 09, 2003 at 09:21:42 (PDT)    [207.183.118.61]
One day the terrorists will nuke america, meanwhile enjoy as much cheap oil as you can yankee.
JJH
   Tuesday, April 08, 2003 at 11:40:56 (PDT)    [203.22.113.84]
Get a life!,

With all your colorful analogy with farm animals I suspect your education level must also hover around there.

A drop in .06 cents after an increase of .20 cents is not deflation. It is still called inflation.

That's the funny thing you haven't realised China is the next largest consumer market and closer to SK and Japan. So the logistics of them doing trade with China is cheaper than the USA. Which means overall those two countries will naturally develop stronger economic ties with China than the USA.

Also the consumer market is driven by cheaper goods. If the goods are too expensive than our consumer market shrinks. Think about it China is the manufacturer to the world. Their consumer market is right in front of them. USA due to unionization and inflation can no longer be a manufacturer of consumer goods. You starting to see the picture.

If you think the USA is invunerable to foriegn preassure I think you are mistaken. We even have to send people to Russia to say we are sorry.

Look at all those Americans that lease cars that are out of their range of affordability. Also based on recent home equity loans report, it seems in the next 2 years there will be a lot of foreclosures coming up. And the average American carries around $10,000 in personal credit card debt. So you see USA is always in the habit of getting things they cannot afford.
AC Dropout
   Tuesday, April 08, 2003 at 09:24:55 (PDT)    [24.136.115.189]
Get a life,
>But SK and Japan's economy are also dependent on China. Their exports have even more China stuff in it.

I wouldn't say SK and Japan's economy is 'dependent" on China's. But those two countries are definately dependent on US. Then again whose isn't? USA as the largest consumer market makes the world go around.

>You'd be surprised how quickly China's car market has grown recently. If you invested 10 years ago, you might not look at it so lightly.

You mean like invest in China produced junk like "Xiali" that sells for $4,000 USD? Then again you might be right, I heard Chinese are quite vain.
For example, I recently read an article on growing China's carmarket. A law professor in Beijing decided to purchase a Mazda ($22,000 USD) car that's worth fives times his annual salary instead of cheaper VW Polo. He felt Mazda provides more prestiage for person of his status.
Now who in his right mind would buy a car FIVE times his annual salary?? Except Chinese consumers, its like the ghettos mentality, drive a car you can't afford but live in run down crap neighborhoods.

>War on Iraq. France it just one country that is interested in protecting its loans to Iraq. Russia, China, all 23 Arab nations are already galvanizing passively against us.

Like US is really threaten by this third world coalition.Look at the list of countries China wants to ally herself with. Only France is industrialized and they're already back paddling fast as they can. Can't sell raisins to US, might as well kiss our ass and try selling wines again.

>Notice the slight increase in all your stuff that we attribute to inflation. Now you know one of the driving forces behind inflation
AC Dropout

What slight increase? Just heard on CNN price of gas has drop .6 cents across the country since the war. AC Dropout making things up again. Just admitt it AC, China backed the wrong horse and hope the US makes them pay for growling at the hand that feed her.
Get a life!
   Monday, April 07, 2003 at 19:19:56 (PDT)    [205.188.208.5]
WHO THE PH*** WANTS IT??? Apparently, North Korea...
OK, there's better not be any more war after "Operation kick Saddam's Ass Part 2". To those North Koreans, "back the ph*** up!! I ain't getting drafted! I just graduated and need to kick start my career, and it's hard to do so in this economy. Communist bastards!!!
lordt78
   Monday, April 07, 2003 at 08:34:25 (PDT)    [140.212.205.40]
To: All Korean War freaks.

If a bomb hits N.Korea from USA or from Japan. WW3 will happen. It will be all out war in which United States and its allies don't want to risk. The risk is more loss than gain.
By President George Bush
Peace People
   Tuesday, April 01, 2003 at 16:05:08 (PST)    [218.145.25.77]
Get a life,

But SK and Japan's economy are also dependent on China. Their exports have even more China stuff in it.

You'd be surprised how quickly China's car market has grown recently. If you invested 10 years ago, you might not look at it so lightly.

War on Iraq. France it just one country that is interested in protecting its loans to Iraq. Russia, China, all 23 Arab nations are already galvanizing passively against us. Notice the slight increase in all your stuff that we attribute to inflation. Now you know one of the driving forces behind inflation
AC Dropout
   Tuesday, April 01, 2003 at 09:31:19 (PST)    [24.136.115.189]
>I doubt we can really do much with China. Asymmetric warfare on the economic front has USA totally dependent on China right now. Consumer confidence drives the USA economy. If that fails, it is the USA that will fall apart not China. China can still trade with Europe and Asia.
Sadly due to our own foriegn policy we cannot trade with Europe and Asia on such good terms anymore.
AC Dropout

Yeah right stupid. What's the percentage of China's exports to Western Europe?? And South Korea and Japan wouldn't trade with US? Where would they export their cars to? China?? PAHAHA.
Haven't you heard since the war with Iraq more and more countries are supporting the US, as expected. Even the French government is publicly supporting US for a quick war now. Afterall, they can't sell their Cognac to the Chinese who can't afford it.
Get a life
   Monday, March 31, 2003 at 20:20:02 (PST)    [152.163.188.228]
NK is next on US's list.

I doubt we can really do much with China. Asymmetric warefare on the economic front has USA totally dependent on China right now. Consumer confidence drives the USA economy. If that fails, it is the USA that will fall apart not China. China can still trade with Europe and Asia.

Sadly due to our own foriegn policy we cannot trade with Europe and Asia on such good terms anymore.
AC Dropout
   Monday, March 31, 2003 at 07:17:58 (PST)    [24.136.115.189]

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